Travel Basics

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Transportation Information

Visas & Passport

Visas & Passport

Foreign nationals entering Korea are generally required to have a valid passport and a Korean visa assigned by overseas branch of Korean embassy or consular offices. However, many are now permitted visa-free for a limited period under certain conditions following the "Citizens of the Countries under the Visa Exemption Agreement". In order to check whether you're allowed to enter Korea without visa issuance and for other requirements, please contact the Korean immigration offices or visit the following websites to confirm.

Detailed information
http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/enu/TRV/TV_ENG_2_1.jsp

Immigration

Immigration

From January 2012, any inbound foreign visitor of age 17 or older entering Republic of Korea (herein after Korea) through any port or airport in Korea is required to go through a mandatory fingerprint and facial recognition registration process. The mandatory information registration process is waived for the following persons: foreign government officials and international organization representatives, as well as their family members; and visitors with an official invitation from the central government of Korea.

Detailed information
http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/enu/TRV/TV_ENG_2_2.jsp

Currency & Exchange

Currency & Exchange

Korea's official monetary unit is the won.

When you need to exchange your foreign currency into Korean won, visit a bank or authorized exchange service center. Banks are generally open 09:00-16:00 on weekdays, with the exceptions of Standard Chartered Bank, operating 09:30-16:30, and EVERRICH Bank, with hours of 09:00-16:30.

Detailed information
http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/enu/TRV/TV_ENG_1_3.jsp

Electricity & Communications

Electricity & Communications

As the distribution of cell phones, smart phones and related mobile devices increases in Korea, public phone booths are steadily decreasing. However, there are still some public phone booths at popular sites, bus stops, and subway stations. Korean public phones generally provide local and international call services alike with payment accepted by coins or phone cards. Telephone cards can usually be purchased at convenience stands or stores near the telephone booths. Payment can also be made with a transportation card, but this option is not accepted at all phone booths so please check in advance.

Detailed information
http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/enu/TRV/TV_ENG_1_4.jsp

Public Holidays

Public Holidays

Koreans officially follow the Gregorian calendar, even though there are a few holidays that are based on the lunar calendar. During the official holidays, offices and banks are closed but palaces, museums, most restaurants, department stores, and amusement facilities are open. Seollal and Chuseok are the most important traditional holidays for Koreans, so millions of people visit their hometowns to celebrate with their families during these times. On Seollal, Koreans hold a memorial service for their ancestors and perform sebae, a formal bow of respect to their elders as a New Year’s greeting.

Detailed information
http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/enu/TRV/TV_ENG_1_1.jsp

Emergency Situations

Emergency Situations

Many of Korea’s large hospitals operate an International Health Care Center, catering to international visitors. These centers offer top-notch medical services and have expert translators available to assist with the entire process, from reservations to treatments and follow-up appointments.

Detailed information
http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/enu/TRV/TV_ENG_1_5.jsp